AWEA Small and Community Wind Conference & Exhibition


Portland, OR - The AWEA Small and Community Wind Conference & Exhibition unites wind industry leaders with economic development groups, municipalities, and consumers eager to play a bigger role in the use and expansion of wind energy and its economic potential. The conference is designed to foster networking and encourage strategic thinking for the use of small wind technology and community-owned wind.

Event type: 
Geographic Area: 

Harvesting Clean Energy 8


The Harvesting Clean Energy Conference is the Northwest’s premiere gathering for agriculture and energy interests working to advance new opportunities for agriculture producers and rural communities in clean energy production. Clean energy offers real solutions – financial and practical – for our farmers, ranchers, rural utilities and towns, tribes, and regional economy.

Event type: 
Geographic Area: 

Growing Green Enterprise Workshop


The October 3, 2007, Growing Green Enterprise Workshop in Willmar, MN features Windustry Executive Director Lisa Daniels as one of the presenters at the day-long series of workshops including discussions, presentations, engaging conversations, and interactive sessions covering ...

Local environmental and economic development issues providing opportunities for poverty alleviation and self-employment.

Event type: 
Geographic Area: 

A Comparative Analysis of Community Wind Power Development Options in Oregon

A Comparative Analysis of Business Structures Suitable for Farmer-Owned Wind Power Projects in the United States (November 2004) was prepared for the Wind & Hydropower Technologies Program, U.S. Department of Energy, by Mark Bolinger and Ryan Wise.

For years, farmers in the United States have looked with envy on their European counterparts' ability to profitably farm the wind through ownership of distributed, utility-scale wind projects. Only within the past few years, however, has farmer- or community-owned wind power development become a reality in the United States. The primary hurdle to this type of development in the United States has been devising and implementing suitable business and legal structures that enable such projects to take advantage of tax-based federal incentives for wind power. This article discusses the limitations of such incentives in supporting farmer- or community-owned wind projects, describes four ownership structures that potentially overcome such limitations, and finally conducts comparative financial analysis on those four structures, using as an example a hypothetical 1.5 MW farmer-owned project located in the state of Oregon.

Read the Report

Subscribe to Oregon