Developer Owned

Landowner Guide to Evaluating a Wind Developer

This handout is designed to help landowners evaluate a wind developer before they sign an agreement. It is intended to provide a brief discussion of many topics and additional resources, including:

  • Where can I find information about a developer?
  • What makes or breaks a wind project?
  • Does the developer have the ability to finance the project?
  • What is the relationship of my wind resource to electricity power lines?
  • How will I get paid?

Click below to download the PDF file.

Wind Lease Worksheet for Landowners

The Department of Agricultural, Food and Resource Economics at Michigan State University has published a document entitled "Landowner Guidelines for Evaluating Wind Energy Production Leases". It is aimed at landowners across the country.

This worksheet is designed to help landowners evaluate some important considerations when reviewing a wind energy lease and/or easement agreement. It provides comments on alternatives to lease provisions, where appropriate, and will help walk a landowner through the often complex multi-page agreements. Click here for the .pdf file.

Wind Rights and Wrongs

This article reprint from Tierra Grande, April 2008, presents an overview of many issues regarding leasing your land to a wind developer. Topics covered include wind data, tax credits, royalties, severance clauses, surface rights and a host of other considerations. While focused on Texas, the article presents information that applies to all wind agreements in general and is useful for both landowners and attorneys.

Arkansas Wind Energy Conference


The Arkansas Energy Office is sponsoring a day-long Arkansas Wind Energy Conference on January 17, 2008 at the University of Arkansas at Fort Smith.

Keynote speaker Larry Flowers of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory will discuss global and national trends for wind energy.
There will also be a discussion of the costs of wind-produced electricity, land leasing and financing options through private and public/private investments.

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Wind Project Financing Structures: A Review & Comparative Analysis

This report from Lawrence Berkley National Laboratory was released in September, 2007. The report, titled "Wind Project Financing Structures: A Review & Comparative Analysis," was authored by John Harper (Birch Tree Capital, LLC), Matt Karcher (Deacon Harbor Financial, L.P.), and Mark Bolinger (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory), and was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Wind & Hydropower Technologies Program.

The rapid expansion in the U.S. wind power industry over the past few years has required the mobilization of a tremendous amount of capital. In 2007 alone, for example, an estimated $6 billion will be invested in new wind projects in the U.S. To attract this kind of capital, the wind power sector has, in recent years, developed multiple financing structures to manage project risk and allocate Federal tax incentives to those entities that can use them most efficiently. These structures are the underlying focus of this report.

Specifically, the purpose of this report is three-fold: (1) to survey recent trends in the financing of utility-scale wind projects in the United States, (2) to describe in some detail the seven principal financing structures through which most utility-scale wind projects (excluding utility-owned projects) have been financed from 1999 to the present, and (3) to help understand the impact of these seven structures on the levelized cost of energy from wind power.

The seven structures -- which range from simple balance-sheet finance to several varieties of all-equity partnership "flip" structures to leveraged structures -- feature varying combinations of equity capital from project developers and third-party tax-oriented investors, and in some cases commercial debt. Their origins stem from variations in the financial capacity and business objectives of wind project developers, coupled with the investment risk tolerance and objectives of the tax-oriented investors and debt providers.

The full report (including an executive summary) can be downloaded from:

In addition, a high-level PowerPoint summary of the document is available at:

[Text of this item is adapted with minor changes from from a 09/2007 LBNL press release.]

Community vs. Corporate Wind: Does it Matter Who Develops the Wind in Big Stone County, MN?

This report reviews various business structures for community wind development, reviews previous studies on the economic impact of both wind development in general and the relative impacts of corporate and community wind development, and investigates the specific case of the economic impact of community vs. corporate wind development for a multi-turbine project in Big Stone County, Minnesota.

The report found that community owned wind can have a significantly larger economic impact than corporate wind development.

This report by Arne Kildegaard of the University of MN, Morris and Josephine Myers-Kuykindall of the University of MN, Morris, was published September 2006.

Read the Report

Wind Energy Land Agreements: Best Practices and Policy Recomendations

The Wind Easement Workgroup developed a list of recommended policies and practices for facilitating orderly and sustainable wind energy development. These policies are designed to protect landowners, enhance economic development opportunities in wind energy, and broaden access to wind energy market information.

Click on the link below to read the document.

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