Wind Project Calculator

Windustry Wind Project Calculator

The Windustry Wind Project Calculator was designed by Alice Orrell, Alice Orrell Consulting, and Windustry for the Community Wind Toolbox.

The Wind Project Calculator was developed to assist in performing cash flow modeling for community wind projects. You will need to enter specific information about the type of turbine you are considering, the estimated annual average wind speed, information about electricity use and electric rates, and information about financing and income taxes. The program will estimate the cash flows for investing in a wind turbine and the rate of return on the cash investments.

Use this calculator in conjunction with software from the Idaho National Laboratory. The software from Idaho National Laboratory is designed to combine validated wind resource data with wind turbine power curves to calculate average wind speed, estimated annual energy production, and capacity factor. Also included with the software is a program to help you create a wind rose for your site. The software is available at

Use of the Windustry Wind Project Calculator is for informational purposes. You may not modify any content, create derivative works from, transfer or sell any information, products or services obtained from Windustry unless expressly permitted by Windustry. Elements of the Windustry Wind Project Calculator are protected by trade dress, trademark, unfair competition, and other laws and may not be copied or imitated in whole or in part. The Windustry Wind Project Calculator is provided "as is," and Windustry makes no warranties or representations of any kind that the services provided by this software will be uninterrupted, error-free, or free from viruses or other forms of harmful computer code. You may not remove the Windustry logo from this software nor from printed pages of or created by this software, and you must attribute this software and it's printed creations in all forms and formats to Windustry. See the Windustry Terms of Use for further information.

Also see:

Woman of the Year Award

Each year, WoWE recognizes one woman who truly stands out for her leadership, inspiration, and significant contributions to the expansion and improvement of the wind energy industry. She may be the leader of a company or organization, or work behind-the-scenes to resolve critical wind energy issues. Woman of the Year nominees may serve in legal, technical, business, advocacy or other wind industry roles.

2009 Woman of the Year Award

Karen Conover
Karen Conover

Karen Conover is one of the most deeply respected leaders of the wind energy industry. She has over two decades of experience in wind technology and other renewable energy applications and has conducted wind energy work throughout the U.S. and in over twenty countries. Karen was co-founder of Global Energy Concepts, a company that grew from a handful of staff in 1994 to 100 employees and two offices, acquired in 2008 by DNV. Karen now serves DNV Global Energy Concepts as Director of Wind Business and Strategy Development. An active board member for the American Wind Energy Association since 1995, Karen was the first woman and also the youngest person appointed to serve AWEA in this capacity.

2008 Woman of the Year Award

Rachel Shimshak
Rachel Shimshak

Rachel Shimshak is the Director of the Renewable Northwest Project (RNP) in Portland, Oregon. She is a pioneer in the wind energy advocacy field, and has been the Director of RNP since its inception in 1994. Rachel is responsible for putting the Northwest on the map of wind energy development. Under her leadership, RNP has been instrumental in passing strong renewable energy policy in the Northwest.

2007 Woman of the Year Award

Jan Hamrin

Jan Hamrin

Jan Hamrin, President of the Center for Resource Solutions, received the second Woman of the Year Award in 2007.

2006 Woman of the Year Award

Jan Blittersdorf
Jan Blittersdorf

Jan Blittersdorf, CEO of NRG Systems, Inc., received the first ever Wind Woman of the Year Award in 2006 for her outstanding work in the field of wind energy and a passion for renewables.

Click here to return to the WoWE home page.

Comparing Statewide Economic Impacts of New Generation from Wind, Coal and Natural Gas in Arizona, Colorado and Michigan

This 2006 report from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory assesses the direct economic impacts of constructing new electricity from wind, coal and natural gas in three different states. Initial results showed that new electricity generation from wind could be more economically effective than adding new electricity generation from gas or coal power and that new wind electricity generation keeps more dollars local.

Read the report


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