Community Wind - Resources

New Report from ILSR: "Minnesota Feed-In Tariff Could Lower Cost, Boost Renewables and Expand Local Ownership"

This January 2008 policy brief from the New Rules Project of ILSR highlights how several European countries, and more recently the Canadian province of Ontario, have adopted a simple yet powerful strategy to expand renewable energy and benefit local economies. It is called a feed-in tariff: a mandated, long-term premium price for renewable energy paid by the local electric utility to energy producers. Evidence shows that a feed-in tariff achieves greater results at a lower cost than do other strategies like tax incentives or renewable electricity standards.

Click here to go to the New Rules Project website and download a copy of the report.

Wind Powering America's "Schools" Web Page

Wind Powering America (a program of the U.S. Dept. of Energy) has a page of resources for schools interested in wind energy at http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/schools.asp

Resouces on this page include:

  • A map showing where school wind projects have been installed throughout the U.S.
  • Updates on WPA's project to create an easily replicable model for school wind projects
  • A directory of wind energy educational programs
  • And links to teaching materials, tools and resources.

This fact sheet provides an overview of the system components of a Wind Powering America Wind for Schools project.

download

Wind Project Financing Structures: A Review & Comparative Analysis

This report from Lawrence Berkley National Laboratory was released in September, 2007. The report, titled "Wind Project Financing Structures: A Review & Comparative Analysis," was authored by John Harper (Birch Tree Capital, LLC), Matt Karcher (Deacon Harbor Financial, L.P.), and Mark Bolinger (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory), and was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Wind & Hydropower Technologies Program.

The rapid expansion in the U.S. wind power industry over the past few years has required the mobilization of a tremendous amount of capital. In 2007 alone, for example, an estimated $6 billion will be invested in new wind projects in the U.S. To attract this kind of capital, the wind power sector has, in recent years, developed multiple financing structures to manage project risk and allocate Federal tax incentives to those entities that can use them most efficiently. These structures are the underlying focus of this report.

Specifically, the purpose of this report is three-fold: (1) to survey recent trends in the financing of utility-scale wind projects in the United States, (2) to describe in some detail the seven principal financing structures through which most utility-scale wind projects (excluding utility-owned projects) have been financed from 1999 to the present, and (3) to help understand the impact of these seven structures on the levelized cost of energy from wind power.

The seven structures -- which range from simple balance-sheet finance to several varieties of all-equity partnership "flip" structures to leveraged structures -- feature varying combinations of equity capital from project developers and third-party tax-oriented investors, and in some cases commercial debt. Their origins stem from variations in the financial capacity and business objectives of wind project developers, coupled with the investment risk tolerance and objectives of the tax-oriented investors and debt providers.

The full report (including an executive summary) can be downloaded from:
http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/emp/reports/63434.pdf

In addition, a high-level PowerPoint summary of the document is available at:
http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/emp/reports/63434-ppt.pdf

[Text of this item is adapted with minor changes from from a 09/2007 LBNL press release.]

Property Taxation of Wind Generation Assets

"Property Taxation of Wind Generation Assets," North American Windpower, May 2006, Vol. 3, No. 4, pp. 31-34. This article, written by Warren Ault, summarizes research he did for Windustry in 2005 into the actual and potential local economic benefits of wind power, focusing particularly on a survey of the varieties of approaches throughout the United States to the use of local property taxes. Click on the link below to download a PDF copy of the article.

Farmer's Guide to Wind Energy

This publication was released by Farmer's Legal Action Group in August 2007. According to the FLAG website, "This book serves as a guide to the many legal issues faced by farmers and rural landowners who seek to develop wind energy projects.

The Farmers' Guide to Wind Energy: Legal Issues in Farming the Wind provides legal information for individuals developing wind projects, regardless of size. This includes farmer-owned large utility-scale wind farms as well as smaller on-farm or residential wind turbine projects. Legal issues covered in this guide include negotiating wind property agreements, siting a wind farm, liability risks associated with developing and operating wind turbines, project financing, choice of business structure, government incentives for wind development, and the tax consequences of these efforts."

Click here to go to the FLAG website.

Chapter 14: Interconnection

Interconnection - Getting Energy to Market

The electrical generation, transmission, and distribution system has been labeled the most complex machine ever created by humans. There are many rules and regulations to ensure that it runs reliably, and as a result the process for interconnecting your energy project with this system involves dealing with regulatory agencies at the state and regional level as well as utility personnel, engineering consultants, and lawyers with experience with interconnection contracts. It can take over a year to complete the required interconnection studies and can cost your project up into the hundreds of thousands of dollars. You will need to weigh the results of conversations and studies to determine if it is worth moving on to the next phase of studies or if the cost of interconnection will not allow your site to be profitable.

Ownership: 
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