A (10) | B (1) | C (9) | D (15) | E (8) | F (3) | G (5) | H (3) | I (8) | K (2) | L (4) | M (11) | N (6) | O (3) | P (16) | R (5) | S (10) | T (5) | U (1) | W (6) | Z (1)
Term Definition
Nameplate Capacity

The maximum output rating of a wind generator. A wind turbine that has a 1 MW nameplate capacity will produce 1 MW of power when operating at it’s rated output.

Net Metering and Net Billing

The concept of net metering programs is to allow utility customers to generate their own electricity from renewable resources, such as small wind turbines and solar electric systems. The customers send excess electricity back to the utility when their wind system, for example, produces more power than they need. Customers can then get power from the utility when their wind system doesn’t produce enough power. In effect, net metering allows the interconnected customer to use the electrical grid as a storage battery. This helps customers get higher (retail) value for more of their self-generated electricity. In practice, net metering and net billing vary from state to state based on rules for such arrangements defined by the state. For information about your particular state visit the Database of State Incentives for Renewable Energy: www.dsireusa.org.

Net Present Value

A common financial concept (and a critical component of Minnesota’s C-BED tariff), reflecting the idea that having a given amount of money today is more valuable than receiving the same amount of money in the future. C-BED requires utilities to determine the net present value of their rate schedule using the standard discount factor that they apply to their other business decisions. That means calculating the expected payments over the life of the contract and applying the discount to find the net present value of the series of payments. The net present value is then divided by the total energy produced over the 20 years, resulting in the “net present value rate” – the present value of every kilowatt-hour the project will produce over its lifetime. C-BED requires that the utility establish a tariff that provides for a rate schedule resulting in a net present value rate of up to 2.7¢/kWh.

Network Resource

An electrical generator that can provide support to the system in terms of real or reactive power supply, spinning reserve, or other services that the system operator requires to keep the system operating in a safe and reliable manner. Generally wind projects can only qualify as an energy resource because of their non-dispatchable nature, i.e. they can only supply energy to the system when the wind is blowing and not when the system requires it.

Noise

Wind turbine noise and associated impacts are some of the more important issues facing local authorities in permitting wind projects. Regulations in this category generally refer to a decibel measurement of the sound emissions from a turbine, and increasingly local authorities are asked to consider the concerns of the community in setting these regulations. Many Minnesota counties refer to the state noise standards, while some impose additional requirements and measurements on the appropriate levels of sound from wind turbines in their community.

Non-Utility Generator (NUG)

A generator that is owned and operated by an entity which is not a regulated electric utility.