Questions and Answers about the #stickwindhere Campaign

What do you mean by #stickwindhere?

This is about small and community scale wind projects.  They are important solutions for building our sustainable energy system. Community wind projects can be found powering schools, hospitals, villages, factories, farms, homes, retail stores, and more! Can you find a place to stick wind in your community?

Isn't wind energy too expensive for my community?

No!  There are many options for financing a community wind project.  Check out these links:

 

 Business Models for Community Wind

 

 Case Studies of Community Wind

 

 Community Wind Toolbox

An emerging business model, Community-Shared Wind, will make it even easier to participate in wind energy. Windustry is proposing a National Community Wind Partnership, which will allow individuals to invest directly in wind projects and receive credits on their utility bills.

What is the National Community Wind Partnership?

This is a proposed initiative that Windustry is encouraging the White House Administration to create.  The US Department of Energy has already put together a National Community Solar Partnership that will increase access to solar energy for new markets, particularly urban and low income populations.  We propose that this be expanded to include community wind.

What is the difference between Community Wind and Community-Shared Wind?

There are two forms of development that this campaign encourages: Community Wind and Community-Shared Wind.  

  • Community Wind: a project that is locally owned and provides a sizable percentage of power for a business, community, or public building.  
  • Community-Shared Wind: a project with subscribing members from the community.  Each of these members see their return as a credit on their utility bills instead of a dividend check.  Presently, community-shared renewables is an emerging business model that has mostly been applied to solar energy.  However, it could easily include wind energy.